Will gender pay reporting make a difference?

The causes of the gender pay gap are complex. It is affected by wider cultural and social influences, in particular the prevailing assumptions about the role of women as and by the unequal assumption of responsibility for unpaid domestic work by men and women.

Calls to address the issue are being raised all over the world – in Iceland on 24 October 2016 and in France on 7 November for example campaigners urged working women to down tools in recognition of the fact that the pay gap means that they would effectively be working for free for the remainder of the year. Across Europe the average pay gap between men and women in equivalent jobs is 16.1%.

There is considerable consensus about the measures that are likely to achieve change:

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The art of negotiating divorce settlements

A good divorce is one that is as painless as possible. Sorting the finances out can be a painful part of the divorce process. The cost – both financial and emotional – of court litigation should not be underestimated. The delays in the court system mean that proceedings are often dragged out. Continue reading

A delicate balance – children’s privacy vs public interest in the family courts

Part one of this blog dealt with the decision in Re J, a very difficult case concerning a 7 year old boy (‘J’) whose mother had alleged that he was gender dysphoric and wanted to live as a girl. At a final hearing in July (2016), a judge found that the mother had imposed this belief upon J and, in doing so, had caused significant emotional harm to J, and that J’s interests were better served by living with his father. Continue reading

Gender identity – how the courts approach children’s right to choose

Re J is a very difficult case concerning a 7 year old boy (‘J’). His parents had separated acrimoniously and his mother was refusing to allow J to spend time with his father. This was largely because (she said) the father was uncomfortable with the fact that J identified more strongly with being a girl than a boy. Continue reading

A single approach to abductions?

The 2015 case of Re C (internal relocation) appeared at the time to dramatically alter, and simultaneously clarify, the approach to be taken by the courts in relocation cases. Re C seemed to state that whether a relocation is internal or international, the same principles will be applied by the court in determining whether the move is to be permitted. This therefore provided clarity to a line of case law providing variable interpretations as to the weight to be placed on such factors as the intentions of the relocating parent. Continue reading

Full and frank disclosure is the first commandment…

In protection of the first commandment – the Court’s duty to draw adverse inferences.

In the most recent judgment in the case of Al-Baker v Al-Baker [2016], deputy High Court Judge, Nicholas Cusworth QC hearing the case, drew adverse inferences in assessing the extent of the matrimonial pot, where the husband had failed to provide full and frank disclosure of his assets in financial remedy proceedings. Continue reading

The inequality of civil partnerships

The first opposite-sex civil partnership was celebrated in the Isle of Man recently between Adeline Cosson and Kieran Hodgson. They said they wanted to ‘keep it simple’ rather than have a traditional wedding and that, although they do want to marry one day, it is not what they want now. Whilst the Isle of Man is a Crown Dependency, it is not part of the UK and has different laws. It is the only place in the British Isles which allows and recognises opposite-sex civil partnerships. Continue reading

Social media: anti-social, criminal but also tolerable

Where once news was obtained from the inky-print of hard copy newspapers and from cracking RP voices over the wireless, today social media is the voice that seems to shout the loudest. And in shouting loudly, or quietly, on social media, those who abuse it and infringe the rights of others may well be acting unlawfully. But when does a tweet become a criminal offence, or a blog merit a spell in prison? Continue reading

What type of parent is Rob Titchener?

Being a family lawyer can be a disadvantage when trying to enjoy a television or radio drama. Family law is easily misunderstood and its realities can get in the way of a good storyline; nobody really wants to watch reasonable and calm lawyers helping parties negotiate sensible solutions in an amicable way. Continue reading